Opinion: Christmas is valid any time

Avary Kampwerth

Photo by Liam Killian

Every fall season, the argument of whether or not Christmas music should be played before Thanksgiving starts up again. As soon as Halloween is over, people begin to preach that the jolly music must wait until Thanksgiving. But I believe that the second the clock strikes midnight on Nov. 1, it is time to hit play on the holiday music.

The Christmas season is known to be the only time of year that has produced its own genre of music. Almost every mainstream artist has put out some version of a Christmas song, and everyone has had Let it Snow stuck in their heads at one point in their lives. For those who celebrate, Christmas is about giving and spending time with your friends and family, reflecting on the year and celebrating with one another. 

As college students, Christmas time and the holiday season also means a break from our studies. After a long fall semester, winter break is a time for students to sit back and relax. With that, why wouldn’t students want to start looking forward to the break with a little Christmas music? I am a strong believer in the power of holiday cheer, and listening to Christmas music can not only help students look forward to break, but it is a way to spread good old Christmas cheer. As Buddy the Elf once said, “The best way to spread Christmas cheer is singing loud for all to hear.” Christmas music tends to bring about a sense of relaxation and a time where we can step back from our responsibilities as students. 

What is the argument behind waiting until after Thanksgiving? Even before thanks are given, every store has their Christmas decor up, Christmas stations are back on the radios, and the only thing remaining is left over turkey. Of course, people will argue that playing Christmas music before Thanksgiving means that the November holiday isn’t being cherished enough. 

Yes, while Thanksgiving is its own holiday and deserves to be treated as such, it has always found itself placed within Christmas preparations. While I do agree that Thanksgiving deserves to be viewed as its own holiday, it will never be entirely separated from the Christmas season, or Christmas music. Thanksgiving and Christmas music are intertwined with one another, and boycotting holiday music removes the opportunity for celebration.

I also believe that listening to Christmas music before Thanksgiving is a means to ensure that the Christmas season does not go to waste. November 1st comes with a plethora of disappointments. I spend the day wishing I could have had more time to enjoy the fall season, whether it is carving pumpkins or going to a haunted house. In order to avoid this feeling, I feel that it is important to listen to Christmas music while we can. By doing this, it is ensured that no time is wasted, and the holiday spirit can be felt to the highest degree.

Listening to Christmas music before the official ‘Christmas season’ begins allows us students to get excited for a well deserved break, fully prepare for the celebrations ahead of us, and take the opportunity to feel like a kid again.