Parties Spread Covid as Students Return to Campus

Olivia Bachar

Photo Credit: Unsplash

Colleges and universities are returning to campus amid the COVID-19 pandemic, and parties are sending students back online.

 Parties are breeding grounds for outbreaks of the coronavirus. Let’s say at a party of 30 people, two people come with COVID-19. 

No one at the party wears masks or socially distances consistently, so all other 28 people are infected. 

Consequently, those 28 people infect 28 more people and the cycle of infection continues, which results in an outbreak. Outbreaks cause universities and colleges to be shut down. 

At Illinois Wesleyan University, only 10 positives were reported upon arrival, however that number increased to 68 due to partying. 

At Illinois State University, they have reported over 1000 positive cases also as a result of partying; this is not a good statistic to support students staying on campus. 

Now is not the time to gather in huge groups, in close contact, while not wearing masks. 

Virtual meetings or small groups, while socially distanced and wearing masks, should be the main focus. 

Students who have returned to their college campuses want to stay there for the entire semester, not be forced to go home to do online classes.

 Partying eliminates that possibility for everyone, partiers included; it’s just unfair that it affects the majority of people who wear masks.

I am living in constant fear of being stuck doing online classes for the rest of the semester after making the difficult decision to come to campus for my first semester.

 I already had my last semester of high school ruined, and I refuse for that to happen to my college years too. 

The Class of 2020 has already missed out on so much, including graduation, prom and various other senior activities.

 Freshmen, including me, are trying to remain hopeful for a semi-normal first year. 

For seniors, this year is pivotal, their last year of undergraduate education before they enter the workforce or seek out higher education. 

And sophomores and juniors are looking forward to participating in internships and taking major-specific classes. 

Students are looking forward to participating in internships and starting major-specific classes. 

Nobody wants to be sent home because of other people’s preventable actions, and no one should host or attend any parties that put everyone in danger, from roommates to librarians. 

Also, there are serious consequences from the university for partying during the pandemic.

 A fully online schedule or even suspension for the fall semester are both strong possibilities, which could both put a person behind in their graduation requirements. 

Partying is not worth suspension.

 No college party is worth forsaking the education of yourself and others. 

If, and only if we all avoid partying, keep our distance and wear masks consistently will we have a chance at having a “normal” spring semester. 

Even when college life gets back to normal, partying will still be dangerous. 

A large group of people in close contact without masks could restart the outbreak cycle. Do your part, wear a mask and stay socially distant. 

By wearing a mask and socially distancing, we can break the outbreak cycle sooner than later. Those actions bring us one step forward, while partying takes us three steps back.

  Avoid partying not only to keep yourself safe, but to help keep your fellow Titans safe, to keep everyone together on campus and to help provide a sense of normalcy during the pandemic.