Taking the time to reflect: Meditation room programming

Hannah Horn

The Multifaith Meditation Room is a quiet hidden gem on campus that has undergone some serious revitalization to draw students to the space.

The meditation room is located on the top level of the memorial center up the stairs from Campus Safety and Young Main Lounge. 

Guided meditation nights, de-stress watercolor and journaling programs all have been offered this semester to try and bring some reflective multifaith programming to campus. 

“Multifaith programming is about encouraging students to engage their full selves. Students are able to integrate heart and mind through traditions and practices that make sense for them,” said Stuart Haruyama, the new coordinator of multifaith engagement.

The session started out with senior Amanda Wesche asking the students present on how everyone was feeling and what type of meditation was needed for the day. 

After asking about what people needed to reflect and think about for the day the students decided to focus the first meditation on trust.

Wesche is a multifaith ambassador and she became the meditation room coordinator this year hoping to take more intentional programming up into the space. 

“I wanted to add materials and resources for students to be able to better utilize the space. Since my first year, I’ve seen the Office of Multifaith Engagement help to support all spiritual RSOs and religious, spiritual and secular students,” Wesche said. 

This meditation opportunity allows students to do something they may not get the chance to do very often by taking a minute to breathe in their busy day. 

 “Multifaith programming is about encouraging students to engage their full selves. Students are able to integrate heart and mind through traditions and practices that make sense for them,”  – Stuart Haruyama 

Wesche currently uses Headspace, a popular meditation app, to assist with the sessions focusing on how the room is feeling in that present moment.

Headspace focuses on having people increase their awareness of emotions and trying to gain a healthier perspective through guided meditations and activities centered around understanding particular emotions.

For students interested in these guided meditations, Headspace is available through most app stores for a free trial or a year-long subscription for $9.99. 

The goal of the meditations is to engage with thoughts in a nonjudgemental way, working on mindfulness through thought noting activities. 

“I think the meditation room is a great space because it is welcoming and inclusive of a variety of traditions. It is important as it provides a very calming environment within the hustle of campus life,” Haruyama said.