Once Upon A Time…I wrote an article about Tarantino’s flick

Paige McLaughlin

Once Upon A Time In Hollywood is Tarantino’s second highest grossing movie. Photo: Wikimedia Commons.

Seeing Once Upon a Time In Hollywood it’s easy to say that this is the best movie to hit the silver screen in a long time. 

I’m borderline obsessed with it. It’s stunning in its visuals, with beautifully, simple shots. 

The characters were so well-crafted that while the plot wasn’t especially heavy it still kept me engrossed because of characters I had fallen in love with.

Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt are very recognizable actors. 

Sometimes it’s hard to see the character in a story under the guise of someone so well-known. 

In this movie, however, I saw Rick Dalton and Cliff Booth, and they were outstanding. 

These two never lose their friendship, never fall into the petty arguments, they never end up a cliche. 

These two feel like they’ve known each other forever, and been through the gauntlet together, and built a life around and containing each other. 

Rick and Cliff make this movie work with their on-screen chemistry.

The little moments in this movie matter. 

There’s one sequence in particular that deserves special mention: at one point, three stages of Hollywood life are playing out in a very different, but undeniably connected fashion. 

Cliff is confronted with a profoundly creepy new reality in a place where stories were once created. 

Sharon Tate, played by Margot Robbie, is watching the reactions of the real world to something she helped create. 

Rick is portraying a character in an attempt to make a fictional scenario look real. 

 “This is masterful storytelling; the relationship betwen fact and fiction is especially prevalent for a movie about Hollywood, and in American society today.” 

This is masterful storytelling; the relationship between fact and fiction is especially prevalent for a movie about Hollywood, and in American society today. 

One of the main complaints about the movie is the plot, or lack of. 

But this is more of a personal preference than an issue with the film itself; Once Upon a Time In Hollywood is a slice of life movie, straightforward and unpretentious. 

There’s no grand quest, no liar revealed story arc, it’s just following a few months in the lives of three people in the movie industry. 

If you’re a person looking for something driven more by plot than character, you’ve come to the wrong movie. 

The weakest point of the movie would be the pacing. 

There are just a few too many times when the movie drags on and just a couple of scenes that go on a bit too long, despite the plot and background the film has given itself to work with. 

This would be less of an issue if the movie had more of a dynamic plot, but as is, it does unfortunately become noticeable.

While there are legitimate criticisms of this movie, I urge you to watch and judge it for yourself. 

Anyone who loves movies for movies’ sake should certainly put this love letter to Hollywood on their must-watch list.